A heavy-duty Sikorsky S-64 Skycrane helicopter lifting a complete pre-fabricated house, measuring 28 feet by 44 feet, from the factory to its destination, 1970.

The Sikorsky S-64 Skycrane is an American twin-engine heavy-lift helicopter. It is the civil version of the United States Army’s CH-54 Tarhe. It is currently produced as the S-64 Aircrane by Erickson Inc. CH-54 Carrying F-4 Phantom Source: Source:

Soviet explorer, Nikolai Machulyak, feeding a polar bear and cubs with condensed milk, 1976.

The seemingly dangerous situation depicted in the image, as well as the fact that these accounts don’t always provide accurate captions, led many viewers to be a little skeptical that this was a genuine photograph.  But this picture is quite real. It was taken near the Siberian town Cape Schmidt off the coast of the Chukchi Sea sometimeContinue reading “Soviet explorer, Nikolai Machulyak, feeding a polar bear and cubs with condensed milk, 1976.”

Seems like a long time ago…

The U.S. banned inflight smoking on domestic flights of less than two hours in 1988. This was extended to domestic flights of six hours or less in 1990 and to all domestic and international flights in 2000. In 1994, Delta was the first airline in the USA to ban smoking on all worldwide flights. Source:Continue reading “Seems like a long time ago…”

Neway Auto Wash Bowl, Chicago, 1924.

Car was first run around the pool to flush mud and dirt off the undercarriage, also tightens the wooden wheels causing the wood to swell. The Auto Wash Bowl was built in Chicago in 1924 by the Neway Auto Cleaning & Service Corp., allowing drivers to run around in circles to clean off the undercarriage,Continue reading “Neway Auto Wash Bowl, Chicago, 1924.”

First car phone electronics, 1946.

In 1949, AT&T commercialized Mobile Telephone Service. At the time, only approximately 5,000 customers had the service. Calls required manual assistance by an operator. The call subscriber equipment weighed about 80 lb and required the use of a vehicle to make it mobile, and was therefore considered a car phone. Similar to a modern day Walkie-Talkie, a button hadContinue reading “First car phone electronics, 1946.”

Photograph shows large crowd watching acrobat Max Schreyer doing daredevil bicycle flying stunt from long ramp, 1901.

Riding a bicycle down a narrow chute from a tower 110 feet in the air, picking up speed on the downward part of the chute and then swooping upward off the curved end of the chute. Just before the bike left the chute, he had to propel himself from the machine and dive forward inContinue reading “Photograph shows large crowd watching acrobat Max Schreyer doing daredevil bicycle flying stunt from long ramp, 1901.”

Paul Newman and Clint Eastwood, 1972.

Paul Newman & Clint Eastwood, photographed by Terry O’Neill, 1972. Paul Newman was in Tucson, Arizona at the time making the movie The life and times of Judge Roy Bean for director John Huston. During the same year, Clint was also in Tucson and filming Joe Kidd for Universal pictures and directed by John Sturges.Continue reading “Paul Newman and Clint Eastwood, 1972.”

The portable cone of silence was introduced in 1966, it consisted of two large bubbles for each speaker’s head, and a long connecting tube between the two bubbles, for communication purposes. Maxwell Smart and the Chief use it to talk about Rudolph Hubert’s murder on the stage of Badeff Concert Hall but the Chief’s head gets locked in his half.

Cone of silence. Umbrella of silence. Closet of silence. Source:

The Pneumatic Tube Room at Marshall Fields department store, Chicago, transporting cash and documents between departments in 90 seconds, 1947.

Don’t even have to press send. Source: Marshall-Fields department store, Chicago, 1947. Source: The Central Telegraph Office of the GPO in London, Oct 1932, showing an impressive pneumatic installation. Communications were still labour-intensive; there were 3000 employees. Source: Source: The chief engineer of the Hamburger Grossrohrpost, Dr Heck, shows small-bore and large-bore pneumatic carriers toContinue reading “The Pneumatic Tube Room at Marshall Fields department store, Chicago, transporting cash and documents between departments in 90 seconds, 1947.”

The Ingenues, an all-girls band and vaudeville act, serenading the cows in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Dairy Barn in a scientific test of whether the cows would give more milk to the soothing strains of music, 1930.

Source:

The Mountain Ice Company, circa 1895. This huge operation employed large numbers who cut ice blocks on the Lake in the winter, storing them in a mammoth wooden insulated storage building, and shipping the ice out by rail to fill the iceboxes of city dwellers in warm weather. The Ice house was located off Yellow Barn Ave, near the Silver Springs section of Landing and was owned by Theodore King. The RR tracks were a spur off the Lackawanna Line at Landing and serviced the Ice House as well as the Atlas Powder (Explosives) Co.

The Mountain Ice Company, Landing, NJ, circa 1895. On July 12, 1912 the huge wooden ice storage building of the Mountain Ice Co. burned to the ground in a fire. Source:

Pat Boone with crowds of fans, Akron, Ohio, 1956.

Pat Boone in Akron, Ohio at the Soapbox Derby wearing his signature white bucks. Photo: Pat Boone Enterprises Pat Boone is a legendary American singer, composer, actor, writer and spokesman. He was a #1 pop singer in the United States during the 1950s and early 1960s. He sold more than 45 million records and had 38Continue reading “Pat Boone with crowds of fans, Akron, Ohio, 1956.”

Veterans of Fifth Division shooting dead jumper impersonator on the “Life Savers Parachute Jump” thrill ride at New York World’s Fair, 1940.

It was a different time… details inside. Source: Back of pic. Source: Sharpshooter Brigade practices shooting man in parachute. Source: Back of pic. Source: Parachute Jump thrill ride, 1939-40 World’s Fair, at Flushing Meadows in the Borough of Queens. Source: Parachute ride sponsored by Lifesavers, Worlds Fair, 1940. Source:

Requisitioning auto graveyards and Victory program, 1942.

Hundreds of junked cars, containing tons of metal and rubber scrap were denied to the war effort by the Lenox Motor Company whose auto graveyard is at Colmar Manor, Maryland. Donovan, the owner, refused to sell at established junk prices. The material has since been requisitioned by the U.S. government, 1942. Butte, Montana. Scrap salvage,Continue reading “Requisitioning auto graveyards and Victory program, 1942.”

Transportation of Gun Tube No. 87, near Waldo Grade on August 28, 1939 and final placement, World War Two coastal fortification, San Francisco.

Credit: 16-inch gun on transport trailer, circa 1939. Credit: Fort Cronkhite, Marin headlands. Credit: 16-inch gun and radar at Battery Townsley, Fort Cronkhite, c1948. Credit:

The mailman always delivers.

Rural carrier Lloyd Mortice created this unusual vehicle for use on his snow-bound New England route. Mortice fitted his 1926 Model-T with a steel track on the rear drive shaft, enabling him to drop either wheels or skis into place in front, depending on weather conditions. The company that sold Mortice the steel track laterContinue reading “The mailman always delivers.”

(Over)Loaded logging trucks.

GMC Logging truck, Oregon, Early 1920s. Source: Garford truck Source: Source: A loaded White logging truck Early truck logging using a White truck on a wooden fore-an-aft road at Beaver Creek, Loughborough Inlet, BC. Source: Northern Maine log hauling site. Source: Source: Old trades of yesteryear. Source: Redwood Log Truckage on the Redwood Highway. Source:

Thomas Stevens rode a Penny Farthing from San Francisco to Boston, the first cyclist to cross the United States, 1884.

In 1884 Thomas Stevens rode a Penny Farthing from San Francisco to Boston—the first cyclist to cross the United States. In 1885 to 1886, he continued from London through Europe, the Middle East, China, and Japan, to become the first person to ride around the world. Source: 1887- Thomas Stevens completed the first worldwide bicycleContinue reading “Thomas Stevens rode a Penny Farthing from San Francisco to Boston, the first cyclist to cross the United States, 1884.”

William A. Davidson (in sidecar) and William S. Harley show their catch made on Pine Lake, 1924.

This authenticated photo of the pair disproves the popular claim that the following popular photo is of them. Although the photograph is a genuine one dating from that time period, the backstory commonly attached to it is not. This image first appeared online when it was posted to a web site dedicated to old photographs of Harley-DavidsonContinue reading “William A. Davidson (in sidecar) and William S. Harley show their catch made on Pine Lake, 1924.”

USS Macon, (ZRS-5), The Navy’s Last Flying Aircraft Carrier

USS Macon ZRS-5 under construction at the Goodyear Airdock, Akron, Ohio, 1933. (US Navy) Source: The future USS Macon (ZRS-5) under construction in the Goodyear-Zeppelin Corporation hangar at Akron, Ohio, circa early 1933. Naval History & Heritage Command photo (# NH 42022). Source: USS Macon (ZRS-5) preparing to land. Source: F9C-2 hooked on trapeze (left) and stowedContinue reading “USS Macon, (ZRS-5), The Navy’s Last Flying Aircraft Carrier”

Life and death of the Ohio State Building of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.

Ohio State Building of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition being barged from San Francisco to San Carlos, August 16, 1916. Source: The Ohio Building stood at San Francisco’s Panama-Pacific International Expo in 1915. At the end of the fair, it was floated into the sloughs of San Mateo County (now the city of San Carlos), whereContinue reading “Life and death of the Ohio State Building of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.”

Bay Darnell in Lake Lloyd at Daytona International Speedway, 1964.

Bay Darnell became the second driver to end up in Lake Lloyd after losing control of his Ford during a qualifying race for the first ARCA 250 to be held at the track. (ISC Archives & Research Center/Getty Images) Source: Tommy Irwin’s 1959 Ford Thunderbird was the first, he was involved in a crash duringContinue reading “Bay Darnell in Lake Lloyd at Daytona International Speedway, 1964.”

Miss Lillian Boyer, aerial acrobat, standing on top of flying airplane, 1922.

Lillian Boyer (January 15, 1901 – February 1, 1989) was an American wing walker who performed numerous aerial stunts that included wing walking, automobile-to-airplane transfers, and parachute jumps between 1921 and 1929. Source: Lillian Boyer (January 15, 1901 – February 1, 1989) was an American wing walker. Working as a restaurant waitress but eager to fly in anContinue reading “Miss Lillian Boyer, aerial acrobat, standing on top of flying airplane, 1922.”

Michelin parade float featuring Michelin Twins, 1909 New York automobile carnival

View of parade float featuring the Michelin Twins at 1909 New York automobile carnival parade. Signs displayed on float: “Michelin Twins” and “The Michelin tire surmounts all obstacles as usual.” Bicyclist stands in background. Stamped on back: “Spooner & Wells, Inc., photographers, telephones 3472-3473 Columbus, 1931 Broadway, New York.” Handwritten on back: “Parades–New York automobileContinue reading “Michelin parade float featuring Michelin Twins, 1909 New York automobile carnival”

World’s first “Ferris” Wheel at the Chicago Colombian World’s Fair, 1893.

The George Washington Gale Ferris Jr. wheel was created as an American response to the Eiffel Tower in Paris. The diameter of the wheel was 246 feet, weighing 2000 tons. Each of the 36 cars held 60 people for a total of 2160 passengers. The wheel was driven by two steam engines with a capacity ofContinue reading “World’s first “Ferris” Wheel at the Chicago Colombian World’s Fair, 1893.”

The SS Admiral departing the dock on the Mississippi river with Gateway Arch under construction, St. Louis, 1964.

The SS Admiral was an excursion steamboat launched in 1907 and operated on the Mississippi River from the Port of St. Louis, Missouri from 1940 to 1978. The ship was briefly re-purposed as an amusement center in 1987, and converted to a casino in 1990. The boat was dismantled for scrap metal starting in 2011.

“Diavolo performing his bicycle daredevil act before a large audience.” Conn Baker (January 31, 1871 – October 8, 1944) was an American daredevil and artist. He took up bicycle racing as a teenager in the 1880s. He soon held several world records for speed and endurance. Baker was the first person to perfect a “loop-the-loop” using a safety bicycle. He joined the Forepaugh and Sells Circus in 1901, performing under the stage name of J.C. Carter, aka, “Allo, Diavolo!” He later toured Asia, where he met his future wife Laura Calvert, a member of the Tiller Girls troupe. Baker purchased the David Beers house, a 1805 log cabin, and moved it to Norwich Avenue in Columbus to use as his studio, and later, his home; still standing, it is the oldest residence in all of Franklin County Ohio. After retiring from circus performing, he focused on his landscape painting. He was active in the Ohio Republican Party and worked for the State of Ohio Auditor’s office for many years. Photographed by Fred G, Mathiessen, 1905.

Conn Baker AKA Allo Diavolo, American Daredevil, 1905. Source, image: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Source, title: sciencesource.com Entitled: “Looping the Loop” shows a person going around large upright loop on bicycle. The loop the loop stunt was created by a bicycle daredevil who went by the name Allo Diavolo. To perform theContinue reading ““Diavolo performing his bicycle daredevil act before a large audience.” Conn Baker (January 31, 1871 – October 8, 1944) was an American daredevil and artist. He took up bicycle racing as a teenager in the 1880s. He soon held several world records for speed and endurance. Baker was the first person to perfect a “loop-the-loop” using a safety bicycle. He joined the Forepaugh and Sells Circus in 1901, performing under the stage name of J.C. Carter, aka, “Allo, Diavolo!” He later toured Asia, where he met his future wife Laura Calvert, a member of the Tiller Girls troupe. Baker purchased the David Beers house, a 1805 log cabin, and moved it to Norwich Avenue in Columbus to use as his studio, and later, his home; still standing, it is the oldest residence in all of Franklin County Ohio. After retiring from circus performing, he focused on his landscape painting. He was active in the Ohio Republican Party and worked for the State of Ohio Auditor’s office for many years. Photographed by Fred G, Mathiessen, 1905.”

Wagon train on Marietta Street, Atlanta, 1864.

Sherman in Atlanta, September-November, 1864. After three and a half months of incessant maneuvering and much hard fighting, Sherman forced Hood to abandon the munitions center of the Confederacy. Sherman remained there, resting his war-worn men and accumulating supplies, for nearly two and a half months. During the occupation, George N. Barnard, official photographer ofContinue reading “Wagon train on Marietta Street, Atlanta, 1864.”

San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge approach shortly after opening, 1937.

Lesser known and slightly older than the Golden Gate Bridge, the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge has one of the longest spans in the United States and carries over 260,000 cars each day. Designed by Charles H. Purcell, it opened six months before the Golden Gate Bridge in 1936. After part of the East Span collapsedContinue reading “San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge approach shortly after opening, 1937.”

Group of men and women climbing Paradise Glacier, 1911.

Group of men and women climbing Paradise Glacier in Mt. Rainier National Park, Washington/ Curtis & Miller, photographer; [between 1911 and 1920]. National Photo Company Collection. Prints & Photographs Division. Early mountaineers on Chamonix, France, 1865. Source: Woman and four men climbing Glacier of the Rhone, 1860. Ice cavern in Paradise Glacier, Mt. Rainier National Park. betweenContinue reading “Group of men and women climbing Paradise Glacier, 1911.”

Hollywood life well lived.

My hat is off to you sir. Kirk Douglas in “Female Intrigue”, 1957 Source: Kirk Douglas.com Kirk Douglas is both a movie legend and a Hollywood anomaly: a star divided. Most stars lodge in our collective consciousness. Douglas, while a first-magnitude star, was never quite an indelible one, save maybe for the dimple in hisContinue reading “Hollywood life well lived.”

City Hall subway station, New York, 1904.

City Hall subway station, New York, 1904. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Detroit Publishing Company Collection. The now-abandoned subway station. Felix Lipov/Shutterstock Ticket office, City Hall subway station, New York, 1904. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Detroit Publishing Company Collection.

Saving SF Victorians, 1977.

Original Cool Old Pic of the Day Club post December 18, 2014  This precarious moving of venerable Victorian buildings was documented by photographer Dave Glass in November 1970 San Francisco. What’s pictured here is essentially the result of a thirty year urban renewal scheme for the Western Addition neighborhood, particularly the Fillmore District, which afterContinue reading “Saving SF Victorians, 1977.”

Equipment of the American Red Cross playground at Elbasan, Albania where five hundred children are enjoying the happiest days of their lives. It was constructed under an American Nurse’s direction with two tree stumps and several rough hewn poles. Four Albanian mountaineers supply the motive power, 1920.

“Playgrounds” Source: A home made Ferris Wheel. Erected on the American Red Cross playground at Elbasan. The picture shows American Nurses who took a trip to prove its safety to the children. The children in Albania never knew how to play or work either until the Red Cross came. Here at Elbasan 500 youngsters areContinue reading “Equipment of the American Red Cross playground at Elbasan, Albania where five hundred children are enjoying the happiest days of their lives. It was constructed under an American Nurse’s direction with two tree stumps and several rough hewn poles. Four Albanian mountaineers supply the motive power, 1920.”

Cool old street scenes from around the country and world.

Street scene, Washington, D.C., 1915. Street scene, Crane, Texas, 1939. Street scene, Provincetown, Massachusetts, 1940. Street scene, Muskogee, Oklahoma, 1939. Street scene, Waco, Texas, 1939. Street scene, Chinatown, San Francisco, 1896. Street scene, Valdez, Alaska, 1906. Street scene, Lima, Peru, 1908. Street scene, Spencer, Iowa, 1936. Street scene, Bombay, India, 1922. STREET SCENE IN BOGOTA,Continue reading “Cool old street scenes from around the country and world.”

People watch in amazement as the Los Angeles Aqueduct water starts flowing down the cascades into the San Fernando Valley. The smoke in the background is from canon fire upon the gates opening.

It is estimated that over 30,000 people attended the opening day ceremonies of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. They came to watch the Owens Valley water cascade into the San Fernando Valley, November 5, 1913. Crowds cheer as Owens River water cascades down the channel into the Valley for the first time. Crowds arrive for theContinue reading “People watch in amazement as the Los Angeles Aqueduct water starts flowing down the cascades into the San Fernando Valley. The smoke in the background is from canon fire upon the gates opening.”

San Diego’s original Victorian-style railway depot, built in 1887 for the California Southern Railroad Company, is razed to make way for the opening of the new Santa Fe Depot, 1915.

The clock tower of the original Santa Fe depot at Bay and Broadway is pulled to the ground by a steel cable attached to two yard locomotives as part of the grand opening celebration on March 7, 1915. California Southern’s San Diego passenger terminal as it appeared toward the end of the 19th century. AnContinue reading “San Diego’s original Victorian-style railway depot, built in 1887 for the California Southern Railroad Company, is razed to make way for the opening of the new Santa Fe Depot, 1915.”

Spectators divide their attention as the Mount Hermon High School football team in Massachusetts hosts Deerfield Academy November 24, 1965.

The Game Must Go On! Nov. 19, 2015 — Fifty years ago on Nov. 20, the Mount Hermon football team was hosting arch-rival Deerfield Academy when the already-emotional game took a very unexpected turn.Flames shot out of Silliman Hall, the science building behind the bleachers. With firefighters still on their way to the scene, administratorsContinue reading “Spectators divide their attention as the Mount Hermon High School football team in Massachusetts hosts Deerfield Academy November 24, 1965.”

As the propeller of this Rex Smith aeroplane is engaged, the pilot seems excited, while his passenger does not, 1912.

Early passenger airplane flight. Senorita Lenore Rivero with US aviation pioneer Tony Jannus (1889-1916) in a Rex Smith airplane in 1912. This flight was one of several made by Jannus with female passengers over Potomac Park, Washington DC, USA, in 1911. Rivero was the daughter of the Cuban minister to the USA. This flight reachedContinue reading “As the propeller of this Rex Smith aeroplane is engaged, the pilot seems excited, while his passenger does not, 1912.”

Test pilot George Aird flying a English Electric Lightning F1 ejected at a fantastically low altitude in Hatfield, Hertfordshire, UK, 13th September 1962.

Thanks to Daily Mirror Reference MP_0018484 Mr G P Aird AFC a test pilot with the He Havilland Aircraft Company, ejecting from Lightning P1B XG 332 on 13 September 1962. He was on finals for an emergency landing at Hatfield, following A double reheat fire warning occurred about 15 miles North East of Hatfield. GeorgeContinue reading “Test pilot George Aird flying a English Electric Lightning F1 ejected at a fantastically low altitude in Hatfield, Hertfordshire, UK, 13th September 1962.”

I don’t know which way is up, Control room of the UB-110 German submarine, 1918.

From War History Online: The twin-screw German submarine U.B. 110 was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. … The U-boat’s forward diving rudders jammed in the up position; her port motor short-circuited; and fuel tank was damaged. When she came to the surface, exuding oil, the destroyer GARRY rammed her twice and hit her with severalContinue reading “I don’t know which way is up, Control room of the UB-110 German submarine, 1918.”

Detail of mountain road leading to Smugglers Mine. Telluride, Colorado, 1940.

From The New York Public Library. Mountain road near Telluride, Colorado, 1940. From The New York Public Library. Precipitous road up the mountain’s side to the Smugglers Mine. Telluride, Colorado, 1940. From The New York Public Library. Much revetment work is required in building mountain roads near Telluride, Colorado, 1940. From The New York PublicContinue reading “Detail of mountain road leading to Smugglers Mine. Telluride, Colorado, 1940.”

Corn-Ethanol gas station, Lincoln, NE, 1933.

This photograph, from the MacDonald Studio of Lincoln and now in the collection of the Nebraska State Historical Society, shows cars belonging to Nebraska Governor Charles W. Bryan (left) and the Merrick County sheriff at the Earl Coryell station, Fourteenth and N streets, Lincoln, on April 11, 1933. Their tanks are being ceremonially filled withContinue reading “Corn-Ethanol gas station, Lincoln, NE, 1933.”

Steam Driven Tractor Loaded with Logs, Algoma District, Ontario, circa 1915.

The Lombard Steam Log Hauler as it was officially known looked and operated much like a small steam locomotive. It had an engineer and fireman that maintained the boiler pressure and controlled the speed of the engine, but was steered by a man sitting in front of the boiler. The Pine Lumber Co. of DevonContinue reading “Steam Driven Tractor Loaded with Logs, Algoma District, Ontario, circa 1915.”

Tow truck and Ford automobile in front of Pardo Auto Sales, Wyandotte, Michigan.

View of a tow truck and Ford automobile in front of Pardo Auto Sales at Wyandotte, Michigan. Painted on side of truck: “Pardo, 126 Biddle Ave., Ford sales & service.” Handwritten on back: “Ford, ca. 1923-25.” Courtesy of the National Automotive History Collection, Detroit Public Library https://digitalcollections.detroitpubliclibrary.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A256657

Jailer Mrs. Patrick Conway, known to keep order by physical beatings. Also cooked nutritious meals for the guests. Tom Green County Jail, San Angelo, TX 1921.

Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [reproduction number, e.g., LC-B2-1234] The Galveston Daily NewsGalveston, Texas05 Dec 1921, Mon  •  Page 4

This photo was taken on Main Street in Sheridan, WY, in the early 1900s. The image is taken from a postcard titled “The Way They Ride in Sheridan, Wyo.” The man sitting atop the mounted elk is Otto Ernst, longtime Sheridan businessman. The same elk appears in several early Sheridan photos.

Photo and title courtesy of Sheridan County Historical Society & Museum Link Photo credit: Downtown Sheridan Association Started in 1902 by Otto F. Ernst, the saddle and harness shop required help from the entire family. In 1908 the business began its time at this location where the family business remained until 1976.  With the riseContinue reading “This photo was taken on Main Street in Sheridan, WY, in the early 1900s. The image is taken from a postcard titled “The Way They Ride in Sheridan, Wyo.” The man sitting atop the mounted elk is Otto Ernst, longtime Sheridan businessman. The same elk appears in several early Sheridan photos.”

Workers assembling fuselage section for B-26 bombers, Hudson Motor Car Company, 1942-45.

View of a man and woman assembling fuselage sections for a B-26 Marauder bombers at the Hudson Motor Company factory in Detroit. Label on back: “Hudson Motor Car Co., Detroit, Mich. Plane fuselage assembly line in an auto plant. Hitler and Tojo failed to foresee the rapidity with which American automobile plants could convert theirContinue reading “Workers assembling fuselage section for B-26 bombers, Hudson Motor Car Company, 1942-45.”

Technician doing maintenance work on a #1 crossbar switch, 1938.

Technician doing maintenance work on a #1 crossbar switch, East 30th St., New York, New York, 1938. Each large link frame contains 20 crossbar switching units. These units contain electromechanical relays and involve no large mechanical movements, as in the panel switch. Indeed, the only mechanical movements are the opening and closing of the relays.Continue reading “Technician doing maintenance work on a #1 crossbar switch, 1938.”

Rose Parade Through the Years

Photograph of religious floats at the Rose Parade, 1925. A float with a large cross on it slowly rides along a paved street to the left of center while gigantic dense crowds of spectators stand on both sides of the street and into the distance. The exceptionally large crowd of parade watchers might indicate thisContinue reading “Rose Parade Through the Years”

Disclaimer

Disclaimer:All pictures shown on this site are property of their respective owners. We don’t hold any copyright of these pictures. These pictures have been collected from different public sources including different websites, considered to be in the public domain. If anyone has any objection of displaying any picture here, just send us a message and weContinue reading “Disclaimer”